How To Divide Perennials

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When divided every few years, perennials benefit by becoming stronger and producing more blooms. Dividing perennials create more, smaller, clumps of the same plant. Even if more plants are not desired, perennials should be divided to rejuvenate old plants.

The first step to division is to dig up the plant to be divided. Wash a majority of the soil away from the roots so you can easily determine where to make the division. Some plants can be divided by gently pulling off sections of the crown, while other plants may require a sharp, clean knife to cut through the roots. Do not take too many divisions from one plant, as each section must have enough healthy roots to sustain growth. If any part of the root looks dead, damaged, or diseased, trim it back to healthy white tissue.

As a general rule, plants that flower in the spring and early summer should be divided in the fall. Plants that flower in summer and fall should be divided in the spring before new growth is too large.

PLANTBEST TIME TO DIVIDE
AsterSpring
Bleeding HeartSpring or Fall
CampanulaSpring or Fall
ChrysanthemumSpring
ColumbineSpring
CoreopsisSpring
DelphiniumEarly Spring
EchinaceaSpring or Fall
GailardiaSpring
GeraniumSpring or Fall
HostaSpring or Fall
IrisLate Summer, Fall
LilyFall
MonardaSpring
Oriental PoppySummer
PhloxSpring
RudbeckiaSpring or Fall
ScabiosaSpring
SedumSpring, Summer
VincaEarly Spring
YarrowSpring, Late Summer
YuccaSpring or Fall

See how to propagate perennials, here.